Monday, August 14, 2017

David's Portrait


"Youth Resolute" (detail ) 24 x 30 inches, pencil, charcoal, pastel

So I thought I would show the stages of the portrait of my son David. Started out with H pencils and then went as far as a 4B and Negro pencil before adding charcoal and white pastel. I still have to add some final touches but the far right is the latest stage. I work in layers, constantly correcting. I turn him upside down and look at him in the mirror so that I can pick out flaws in proportion and depth. I took a series of pictures of David in lighting that added a bit of drama. His facial expressions are fascinating to me. When his face is resting he can look a bit melancholic even when he is not (kind-of like me). When I shot the pose of him looking down at me-- I'm only 4'11"--I really liked the look he gave me, immovable, resolute...which is so David. He can sometimes be a little stubborn (he is still teen after all) but he is not too proud to own up to short-comings. I like that he has an immovable sense of justice--doesn't like to see people taking advantage of others. He really is a true-blue kind of guy.

Wednesday, July 26, 2017

The Art League in Alexandria and Another Drawing of My Daughter

Before I begin about the drawing posted below, I just want to say that I am so delighted and thankful that the drawing I posted of my daughter previously this month, (Before the Breakthrough) won an honorable mention at the Art League Gallery in Alexandria (their juried exhibition for July). We weren't able to attend the awards ceremony because we were away at the beach but last weekend, my daughter and a friend of hers from college went up with me to see it on display. Had to take a pic of her beside it! This is it's last week on display.

The drawing below is another one of my daughter that I did with pencil and charcoal. The hat was given to her by a sweet family that took her to an equestrian event some time ago. Many of the ladies wore fancy hats like they do at the Derby or Ascot. Needless to say, I was thrilled by the look of it and will probably do a few more drawings featuring this charming hat! I had a lot of fun rendering the face in subtle shadow though transition of values in some areas of the face are not quite right. I think I will need to work on it a little more before I enter it into a juried show. Also in the works is a drawing that I am doing of my son. I am very excited about how the values are coming and will post a series of pics on the progression of his portrait soon. As always thanks for looking :)

"Thinking Hat" 14 x 18 inches, pencil and charcoal on toned paper
© Christine Angelotta Dixon

Friday, July 7, 2017

Working W/ Graphite

"Young Bowman" 22 x 28 inches, graphite

I am really enjoying working with different shades of graphite and recently have bought some graphite powder to try some interesting affects! Will show you more works using that medium. In the meantime I have posted a recent drawing here using only pencils. I used 2H, HB, 2B, 4B, 8B and black negro pencil which really was the best enhancement to the darker areas. Sometimes when working with charcoal or graphite, it is good to "tone" the background or purchase paper that is already toned so that highlights and shadows are more enhanced (creates more depth). For this drawing I decided to just use textured white paper and the result is more of  "high-key" work of art.


Monday, May 29, 2017

Drawing

So right now I am re-educating myself on the art of drawing. I am doing a lot of reading and examination of works that I find stunning by other artists. I love the drawing techniques of Waterhouse and Rembrandt. They both have very different styles and are from different periods of history. Waterhouse's drawings display a gentle transition of values while Rembrandt's have a lively use of line. A contemporary artist that I really like is David Kassan (among others). His works simply glow.

Below is a drawing that I have recently been working on. I decided to add charcoal to my pencil drawing which may not always be a good idea, especially if you press too hard with your graphite. The sheen produced from doing so will not enable your darker charcoal powder to adhere to the paper. I had to be careful to draw with harder leads and not press too much so that the darker darks could be later applied. I don't know if I will make a habit of drawing this way...will have to see.

The concept of this drawing is that of being boxed in. A feeling that we sometimes have when we are trapped and are unable to see how we can come out of it. The subject isn't in a panic though, she is patiently resigned, perhaps waiting....ready to turn towards the light that gently shines on her.
"Before the Breakthrough"  20 x 24 inches, charcoal and graphite on toned paper

Saturday, February 11, 2017

New Small Works

I have been working on some small works and a portrait that I will reveal in a few more days. The two paintings posted here are ones I am still working on. For the painting with the heart-shaped dish, I wanted to demonstrate the idea of love being a sacrifice...a little drama complete with tiny plastic sword. I may paint the sword a different color since red seems very domineering in the center of this painting. Perhaps the emphasis will grow on me. Also in the works are three small portraits I am working on. Stay tuned!

"Love" oil on panel, 8 x 8 inches



"Peace" oil on panel, 8 x 8 inches


Monday, December 12, 2016

Paintings I Began During Frans Hals Workshop

So here are the paintings that I created at the Rob Liberace workshop on Frans Hals. Really trying to focus on blocking in color quickly and then using a more painterly, loose approach to my brushwork. To aid us in this endeavor, we had to keep our taborets in front of us so as to stretch our arms out to the canvas. Were not allowed to get too close as we needed to focus using fluid arm movement and not tighten our grip on the brush. Of course we could get closer if we needed to add fine detail during the finishing stages. This was a big help to me. I noticed a difference between my strokes during first two days and the last day as I got the hang of it. These paintings were meant to be portrait studies and not completed paintings but I may try to finish them as I did take ref photos of the models. I really hope I am able to take some more classes like this one in the future. Hopefully I can sell more paintings to help with the cost.

Steve, 16 x20 inches, oil
16 x 20 inches, oil

Portrait sketch of Jamie 18 x 24 inches, oil

Wednesday, December 7, 2016

Franz Hals Workshop

Last weekend, I was able to take a class with a nationally known painter who teaches classical painting techniques, Robert Liberace. I have wanted to take one of his classes for a very long time but for various reasons until now, I was unable (e.g. was working or his classes were full). This particular class focused on exploring the painting techniques of 17th-century painter, Franz Hals! A perfect class for me to take since I have been wanting to loosen my brushwork and develop a more painterly technique. Rob is not only a wonderful artist, he is a very thorough teacher. Encouraging as well as tactfully honest, his advice and class demos were very helpful and I hope to be able to take another class from him. I met many lovely and talented people in this class. One man  flew in from Puerto Rico to attend. It was an honor to be there. Below are pictures of the class; a copy that Rob painted of a  Franz Halz; and a painting that Rob did of our costumed model, Steve (man with white beard). I will post my paintings from this class in another post. Thanks for looking.



Demo of Steve by Rob Liberace
Copy of a Franz Hals by Rob Liberace


David's Portrait

"Youth Resolute" (detail ) 24 x 30 inches, pencil, charcoal, pastel So I thought I would show the stages of the portrait of...